Tag Archives: Q

In Conversation with Sanjeev Gupta – director of the award winning film Q

In Conversation with Sanjeev Gupta – director of the award winning film Q

interviewed by Souranath Banerjee

Hello Sanjeev, welcome to Cinema Forensic.

Thank you!

Your debut film ‘Q’ have already taken rounds in some of the most prestigious national and international festivals, and now it’s being released on Netflix! How do you feel about it?

Ya, it feels great!

sanjeev gupta photo 1Q has been selected in many festivals around the world and the response has always been positive.

Earlier I did plan for a theatrical release for my film but while waiting for the CBFC’s response I got the opportunity to show it to Netflix. And I instantly went for it and it got selected as well. I feel so lucky that they have picked up Q. Netflix, as a platform, has a huge audience across 180 countries. That’s the best part. With a deal like this, you know your film will be internationally watched.

Congratulations on the film’s release! Now tell me something about your film Q, what is it about and how did you come up with this concept?

Q is a film about a little girl and her relations with people surrounding her, and then those who come in contact with her, and their combined destiny as the characters go through an incredible journey that comes to an unpredictable end.

Actually I keep watching many documentaries and take much interest in the news and other world affairs. So this concept of Q is Q landscape posterinspired through many such real events that I happened to notice over the time. Though not based on one particular incident, my film is a fictional version of many such realities of life.

And since it’s a very realistic story it needed a realistic treatment as well. No background music used in the film, only Foley sounds and on location recorded natural ambience sounds. I wanted to make sure the audience feel the realism and be a part of it.

That’s  brilliant! Tell me something about you, how did you get inclined in making films, when did you decide to be a filmmaker?

I grew up in Agra and was always into films but never thought it will be my profession of course (smiles).

But then I watched one particular film Shatranj Ke Khilari by none other than Satyajit Ray and it did change something in me. I started gollapudi-srinivas-national-award-2014-111looking at films in a different way! Then, after my degree in Media Studies from Pune, I came to Mumbai and tried to assist people to learn the craft of making movies. But since I had no connection in the film industry I didn’t get any exposure. I did various odd jobs and side by side went on exploring filmmaking.

Finally I wrote my own script and started to narrate it to individual producers and production houses. Then after facing numerous rejections I finally met my producer who believed in me.

And that is how my first film ‘Q’ got made (smile).

Don’t you think that with films like Q you Independent filmmakers are the reason why the indie-film scenario is improving in India?

Yes may be it does. But honestly I have a problem when some filmmakers are called independent filmmakers and some not.

IMG-20140929-WA0006Today I choose to make “Q” and tomorrow I may choose to direct a fantasy film or a VFX film, may be even supported by some production house. But ultimately it’s my films, my story and my way of telling them. I even don’t like such categories like, festival film, theatrical film or an online film – films are films, stories are stories and filmmakers are filmmakers!

All the images are exclusively provided only for the use of this article.

Spectre (2015)

Spectre review.

written by Souranath Banerjee

Few spectacular action sequences that struggles to patch up a very disoriented plot line.

My Ratings: 3/5.

spectre-poster6In 1953, novelist Ian Fleming created the fictional British spy James Bond (code name 007), and ever since, the daring MI6 special agent has managed to entertaining us (through his books and films) by taking up some of the most dangerous missions while valiantly serving his country!

And it’s early Christmas for all the James Bond fans out there (including me), the 24th Bond film is finally released, it’s called Spectre.

James Bond played by the dashing Daniel Craig (his 4th Bond film till date), along with renowned actors Christoph Waltz, Ralph FiennesBen WhishawAndrew Scott and the sizzling Léa Seydoux and Monica Bellucci.  

From talented director Sam Mendes, who also directed the last super hit Bond film Skyfall and is rumored to be directing the next one as well, Bond 25.

spectre-poster2Spectre starts with a thrilling helicopter sequence in Mexico that promises a power pact film but unfortunately, by the end of it’s almost two and a half hours run time, the film struggles to keep you entertained.

An intense Bond and Blofeld confrontation drama was expected from Spectre but instead, mostly due to the lack of a strong script, there seems to be a complete absence of emotional storytelling.

And even the dialogues, the witty punch lines (which is one of Bond’s speciality) are rare to find.

The extreme action sequences, the numerous chasing stunts, the visually appealing titles in the beginning, the explosive destruction in the end, the theme music, the M, the Q, the car, the gadgets, the bond spectre-poster4girl, the villain with a master plan – you get everything as expected from a Bond movie but without much of emotions in them!

After a point of time the film kind of goes into an auto-pilot mode and lets you cruise through the so called Bond theme-park and then finally, when it comes to an end, there is No surprise, No twists – nothing!

Though music by Thomas Newman is as usual effective and blends well with Hoyte Van Hoytema‘s cinematography.

On the acting department nothing extraordinary but everyone pretty much did their part. I think brilliant actors like Christoph Waltz and Ralph Fiennes are wasted because they didn’t have much of a role to show off their talents.

spectre-poster3Overall, definitely not the best Bond movie i have seen.

Then again, the sheer excitement of watching the iconic black-suited man walking through the circles and then shooting at you, the red curtain of blood coming down with the classic bond theme music in the background – all that in the big screen is always something to look forward to.

And now, a long wait for Bond 25. Hope it’s worth the wait.

P.S. – Thank God, we ‘sanskari’ Indians are prohibited from viewing all the sinful kissing scenes which were so abruptly edited out; our protective and caring Indian Censor Board have saved our moral and culture once again! Applause.

Poster courtesy: www.impawards.com.