Tag Archives: Indrasish Roy

Chotushkone (2014)

Written by Abhikendu Deb Roy

Ratings: 4/5.

Cinema and Death – these two issues connect and bind together every reel of Srijit Mukherji’s sixth outing Chotushkone.

Playing with the film tones in Jaatiswar, adding elements of a thriller in 22shey Srabon or introducing a number of sub plots in Hemlock Society – Srijit seems to have culminated all his learnings from his past outings in his recent release and he undoubtedly looks improved.

When the masters of cinema – Aparna Sen, Goutam Ghose, Chiranjit Chakraborty and Parambrata Chatterjee – form the four angles of the mystique thriller, you know that nothing go wrong in the acting department. Parambrata, however, receives a special mention for his outstanding act in the climax.

Apart from these four, an ensemble cast of Paayel Sarkar, Indrasish Roy, Rahul Banerjee among many others play their part sincerely and honestly. But that one cameo that stands out from the rest is of Kaushik Ganguly’s. His acting is undoubtedly going to leave you spellbound during his 3 minutes appearance.

Srijit has taken a few real life elements from the four leads of the film – two of them being Aparna Sen’s “Trina Di” and Parambrata’s “Hawa Bodol Katakuti” reference. The dialogues, penned by Srijit himself, are a reflection of his intelligence (as always) and keep us engaged throughout.

Cinematographer Sudeep Chatterjee, a favourite at the YRF studios who has Dhoom 3 and Chak De India to his name, works wonders for the film. Shot in 5 different tones, the film distinctly allows you to enjoy the visual orgasm.

With indoor sequences predominant in the film, the set design has been looked upon intricately. A self potrait wall-hanging is a common factor present in all the four directors’ residents.

Editor Rabiranjan Moitra could have been better with the scissors as the film, with a 2 hours 21 minutes running time, seems a bit stretched. Also one or two subplots look redundant.

The music composed by Srijit’s favourite, Anupam Roy complements the film pretty well. Lagnajita’s “Bawshonto Eshe Gechhe” fits perfectly in the Paayel-Indrasish shoot sequence. Boba Tunnel is another favourite. The film, like 22shey Srabon, ends with a Rupankar Bagchi number.

Indradip Dasgupta’s background score sinks in as your heart races through every moment of the movie.

They say, “Too many cooks spoil the broth.” Srijit proves it wrong with his fresh new preparation, ready to be served and enjoyed during the Pujas. Go, taste it as it will soothe your tasting buds.

Hrid Majhare (2014)

Written by – Abhikendu Deb Roy.

“Iss dil se bachke rehna, ajeeb aur gareeb khel khelta rehta hai yeh zaalim” – These words resonate in your mind with every passing frame of Hrid Majhare.

The story line remains linear in the beginning but as the film progresses, the complexities develop in many underlying layers. At a night of inclement weather Abhijit (Abir Chatterjee), a Mathematics Professor encounters Debjani (Raima Sen), who is a cardiologist, and predictably enough they soon fall in love. But fate has something else written for them, the doomsday arriving soon.

For the first time director Ranjan Ghosh, Hrid Majhare was the test of his life. To be a visionary and to execute the vision on screen are two very different jobs, which the Whistling Woods pass-out handles quite amazingly.

The casting has been apt and looks appealing on screen. Abir and Raima complement each other beautifully; this being their second film together, post Baishe Srabon.

Abhijit and Debjani’s love flows on the undercurrent of a prophecy, examining their togetherness, questioning their endearments every now and then. The constant conflict between fate and logic which goes on in Abhijit’s mind is portrayed with a certain sense of calmness by director Ranjan Ghosh.

As their love in the film is testified and goes through several ups and downs, the moments of stress are notably plausible.

Indrasish Roy looks highly endearing with his tall dark handsome looks with such a conceivable baritone.

Sohag Sen with hardly five minutes of screen time is the one to look out for. This master of acting, who conducts acting workshops for veteran actors of T-Town, can never go wrong and you so want her to be there for some more time on screen. You cannot simply forget her character, even after the film has ended – such is her impact, such is her charisma.

Barun Chanda is as usual impressive with his voice and powerful acting.

Hrid Majhare is extensively shot both in Kolkata and Andaman.

Correctly addressed as the real hero of the film by the director himself, Sirsha Ray, the Director of Photography gifts us with a visual treat. Collaborating with the art director Nafisa Mondal, Sirsha Ray helps us get a picturesque view of the many indoor scenes in the film.

As for the outdoor scenes which are few in number, Sirsha brings to us a totally different Andaman to what has been generally portrayed in films. The nooks and corners of the busy streets of Port Blair captured in a time lapse, the never ending beaches with the sunlight emanating from the horizon – experimentations have been carried out successfully in this 2 hours 2 minutes feature film.

The editing, by Bodhaditya Banerjee, could have been crisper, which could have helped to portray the distress more effectively.

What works wonders for this film is the background music. The film would not have left such an impact without it. Thanks to Mayookh Bhaumik.

The songs have been used pretty intelligently without being typical song-and-dance sequences in a romantic pot-boiler.

Overall Hrid Majhare is a decent film to watch, especially for the fans of the on-screen couple Raima and Abir.

Film trailer link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrcoSaBZsl0